Aging 2.0 Global Start-Up Search: 2017 Winner.

In follow up to last month’s post, the winner of the April 7th Global Start Up Search for the Toronto Chapter of Aging 2.0 – a local pitch event that awards an entrepreneur for the best “aging-focused start-up” was a company called Steadiwear. Their pitch was for their lead product, the Steadiglove. Under the category of wearbles, this lightweight, battery-free stabilizing glove helps reduce body tremors, as they say –intelligently.

steadigloveA wonderful Canadian innovation success story in the aging and technology space, but how interesting that this is the second product that addresses body tremor issues, to win an award within a week of each other. At the 2017 Stanford Center on Longevity Design Challenge pitch day finals on March 30th the first place winner was TAME – which stands for Tremor Acquisition & Minimization. TAME’s tech-based wearable products are a wristband (for tremor diagnosis) and a sleeve (tremor diagnosis and suppression).

Obviously, there is a market need for these products, as evidenced by the statistics quoted in the TAME website Vimeo: over 280 million people around the world suffer from tremors, which states Steadiwear includes people suffering from Parkinson’s Disease.

Here are some of the other aging and longevity issues that all the global pitch products, from today and tomorrow, aim at solving:

  • adaptable, accessible housing
  • mobility, in home and in transit
  • social isolation and loneliness
  • cognitive impairment, dementia
  • stress of managing caregiving

Long may these pitch events continue, as they continue to push forward technology based innovation in support of the future promise of aging well in a longevity society. At the end of May, Aging 2.0 holds its European Summit in Belgium, with two more such events over the summer in the Americas and Asia-pacific regions, will lead to the big finale in November at the Aging 2.0 Optimize event in San Francisco.

What should be the big hope come true is that eventually these pitch products land on the retail shelf before too long for everyone’s sake, caregivers included. While Aging 2.0 and organizations of its kind have similar goals – “to improve the lives of older adults”, it is not just for those who are older now, but for the older adults of tomorrow. Besides, it is not simply a matter of what age you are, but rather (as my father often said) – it is age in combination with what condition you are in that matters.

 

Mark Venning